Feb 292016
 

I’m so happy to once again be hosting T-SQL Tuesday. If you’re not familiar, T-SQL Tuesday is a blogging party hosted by a different person each month. It’s a creation of Adam Machanic, and it’s been going on for over 6 years now! Basically the host selects a topic, defines the rules, and then everyone else blogs about it. Once everyone’s done, I’ll summarize each of the submitted posts here on my site.

The Topic

This month, I’d like to talk about text, particularly searching and processing it. Many systems contain large amounts of text in one way or another. Often, that text ends up being stored in a database, and SQL Server has offered Full-Text Search for quite a while now to handle such usage cases. But that’s only a small part of the story.

If you’re using SQL Server Full-Text Search, I’d love to hear from you. But I’d also love to hear from anyone using any other kind of text searching or processing methods. Maybe your organization previously used SQL Server Full-Text Search but you’ve since moved to a different application. Maybe you have a tale of success or woe from a previous job. Maybe you don’t let any of your text search operations touch a relational database with a 10-foot pole. Whatever your story is, I hope you’ll please consider sharing it with us all on Tuesday, March 8.

The Rules

There’s only a few rules for T-SQL Tuesday:

  • Your post must be published between 00:00 GMT Tuesday March 8 2016 and 00:00 GMT Wednesday March 9 2016.
  • Your post must contain the T-SQL Tuesday logo (see above) at the top and the image must link back to this blog post.
  • Trackbacks should work, but if they don’t, please put a link to your post in the comments section so I (and everyone else) can see your contribution!

There’s also a few optional you can do that might help:

  • Include “T-SQL Tuesday #76” in your blog post’s title.
  • Tweet about your post using the #tsql2sday hashtag
  • Contact Adam Machanic and tell him you’d like to host a T-SQL Tuesday from your blog.

And that’s all there is to it! I’m looking forward to seeing what everyone writes about!

Feb 292016
 

Thank you so much to the wonderful organizing committee of SQL Saturday Madison 2016 for selecting me to present!

I’m a huge fan of Madison – it’s a great city that’s not-too-terribly far from my house. I’ve had amazing times at their previous SQL Saturdays in 2012, 2013, and 2015, and I can only assume it will be just as awesome this year. They’ve put together a wonderful schedule with amazing presenters both local and from afar.

The presentation I’ll be giving is an introduction to SQL Server Encryption. Security is only getting more important as time goes on, and encryption continues to play an increasing role across the board. While it was once seen as necessary only at the client level, the calls for databases to be encrypted as well are becoming more and more frequent. This session will cover SQL Server’s encryption capabilities and what they have to offer, including certificates, encryption algorithms, backup encryption, transparent database encryption, and column-level encryption.

Registration for SQL Saturday Madison is still open right now, so if you’d like to see a day’s worth of amazing presenters cover Microsoft’s Data Platform technologies, sign up today!

Jan 202016
 

We’re proud to announce our lineup of speakers and sessions for SQL Saturday Chicago, taking place on Saturday, March 5, 2016!

Building a schedule for an event like this is never easy, especially given the number and variety of submissions. Thank you to all who submitted! We received a total of 148 abstracts from 66 different speakers representing 4 different countries and 23 U.S. states. While it would be amazing to include them all, there are neither enough hours in the day nor enough rooms at our venue to do so. The schedule contains 51 sessions from 51 different speakers representing 4 countries and 19 states.

Registration is open and filling quickly, but there’s still spots left as of when this post went live. Register now and get a day of free training, career development, and networking. (Onsite lunch is provided for $15.) Hope to see you there March 5th!

One more thing – we’ve also got pre-cons! We’re offering 4 amazing full-day pre-conference sessions on Friday, March 4. These in-depth workshops provide an amazing opportunity to study with top experts. Lunch, snacks, and coffee are provided with your pre-conference registration fee. See the event page for more details.

 

Dec 032015
 

I’m already at peace with the fact that I’ll never know all of SQL Server’s secrets, but that doesn’t stop me from being surprised every time I figure out something new. In this case, it’s another “secret” hiding in plain sight (Books Online).

It turns out that the DROP DATABASE statement doesn’t just have to drop one database. BOL shows that multiple databases can be specified when separated with commas. Let’s see it in action.

First, create 4 databases:

CREATE DATABASE DB1;
CREATE DATABASE DB2;
CREATE DATABASE DB3;
CREATE DATABASE DB5;

Now drop them:

DROP DATABASE DB1, DB2, DB3, DB5;

Yep, all gone.

But what if there’s an error? Re-run the CREATE statements above, but now let’s drop 5 databases instead of 4. DB4 doesn’t exist (much like Terminal 4 at Chicago’s O’Hare Airport).

DROP DATABASE DB1, DB2, DB3, DB4, DB5;

The above statement will throw an error that it is unable to drop DB4 because that database doesn’t exist, but the other 4 databases are dropped without incident. The same will happen if a user is connected to one of the databases: that one will remain, but all others will be dropped.

So there you have it: you can drop multiple databases with a single statement in SQL Server. (According to Books Online this does not work in Windows Azure SQL Database.) It’s amazing the things you can learn from reading documentation!

 

Nov 242015
 

Registration is now open for Chicago’s 6th SQL Saturday! It will be taking place at DeVry University’s Addison Campus on March 5 2016. Please join us!

If you’re not familiar with SQL Saturday, it’s a free day of training for data professionals, covering a wide variety of topics relating to database administration, database development, business intelligence, and professional development. It’s also a wonderful opportunity to network and meeting others in the SQL community. Registration for the event itself is free, with an optional lunch provided for $15. Space is limited – register today!

The call for speakers is also open – please submit your session(s) by January 5 2016! We are always looking for new presenters. One of the founding principles of SQL Saturday is to develop new community speakers, so if you’ve ever wanted to present at an event like this, consider this your opportunity to submit something!

We hope to see you in March!